Media Coverage on Utah Protest of Prop 8

Today’s Salt Lake Tribune has posted a slide show of yesterday’s protest against the LDS Church regarding it’s involvement on influencing voters on California’s Proposition 8.

 

People gather before marching on the Mormon Temple in protest Friday, Nov. 7, 2008, in Salt Lake City. Leaders of the successful Proposition 8 campaign say an unusual coalition of evangelical Christians, Mormons and Roman Catholics built a majority at the polls Tuesday by harnessing the organizational muscle of churches to a mainstream message about what school children might be taught about gay relationships if the ban failed. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)
People gather before marching on the Mormon Temple in protest Friday, Nov. 7, 2008, in Salt Lake City. Leaders of the successful Proposition 8 campaign say an unusual coalition of evangelical Christians, Mormons and Roman Catholics built a majority at the polls Tuesday by harnessing the organizational muscle of churches to a mainstream message about what school children might be taught about gay relationships if the ban failed. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac)

Thousands protest LDS stance on same-sex marriage

More than 3,000 people swarmed downtown Salt Lake City to march past the LDS temple and church headquarters, protesting Mormon involvement in the campaign for California’s Proposition 8.

Former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson and three openly gay state legislators, Sen. Scott McCoy and Reps. Jackie Biskupski and Christine Johnson, spoke out in support. At one point, the crowd took up the mantra made famous by the country’s new president-elect: "Yes, we can!"

"The main focus is going to be going after the Utah brand," John Aravosis, an influential Washington, D.C.-based blogger, told the Associated Press. "We’re going to destroy the Utah brand. It is a hate state."

The LDS church response, according to the above cited article:

 

Church officials are "disturbed" that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was "singled out for speaking up as part of its democratic right in a free election," said LDS spokesman Scott Trotter earlier Friday.

    "Millions of others from every faith, ethnicity and political affiliation who voted for Proposition 8 exercised the most sacrosanct and individual rights in the United States – that of free expression and voting," Trotter said. "While those who disagree with our position on Proposition 8 have the right to make their feelings known, it is wrong to target the church and its sacred places of worship for being part of the democratic process."

From participants:

"We’ve been quiet for a really long time," said Jen Bogart, 24, who marched beside her girlfriend, with the Salt Lake Temple lit up to her left. "If the gays and lesbians in Utah can march in the streets, the gays and lesbians everywhere can march."
    Doyle Clayburn, 57, said he wanted Utahns to wake up to reality. "There’s not just one or two who care," he said. "It’s not a California issue. It’s a human issue."
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